Katherine Gordon

Katherine GordonA globe-trotting half-French, half-English expatriate Kiwi and a former contracts lawyer and First Peoples' land claims negotiator, she now lives on Gabriola Island, British Columbia, where she continues to write about B.C.'s historical, environmental, political and cultural issues and to work with First Peoples on intergovernmental relationships and strategy development. She is also on the Board of Directors of the First Peoples' Cultural Foundation, an NGO working to ensure that B.C.'s indigenous languages remain a vibrant, living part of Canada's future.

B.C. best-seller The Garden That You Are is Katherine Gordon's fourth book. She has also written Made to Measure: A History of Land Surveying in British Columbia (Sono Nis Press, 2006) which won the 2007 Haig-Brown Regional Prize BC Book Award, and The Slocan: Portrait of a Valley (Sono Nis Press, 2004), which received an honourable mention in the 2004 Historical Writing Competition of the British Columbia Historical Federation and was shortlisted for the B.C. Book Awards' Hubert Evans Non-Fiction Prize in 2005. Both books are also B.C. best-sellers. Her first book was A Curious Life: The Biography of Princess Peggy Abkhazi (Sono Nis Press, 2002). Gordon contributes to The Globe and Mail, the Times Colonist (Victoria), and The Vancouver Sun, as well as to magazines including Canadian Geographic, British Columbia, GardenWise, BC Business, and Canadian Homes and Cottages, and won National Magazine Award recognition in 2006 and 2009.

A globe-trotting half-French, half-English expatriate Kiwi and a former contracts lawyer and First Peoples' land claims negotiator, she now lives on Gabriola Island, British Columbia, where she continues to write about B.C.'s historical, environmental, political and cultural issues and to work with First Peoples on intergovernmental relationships and strategy development. She is also on the Board of Directors of the First Peoples' Cultural Foundation, an NGO working to ensure that B.C.'s indigenous languages remain a vibrant, living part of Canada's future.

For more information, visit Katherine Gordon's website.

Titles by the Author

A Curious Life

The Biography of Princess Peggy Abkhazi

When Princess Peggy Abkhazi died in 1994 in her adopted hometown of Victoria, British Columbia, she not only bore a royal title, she also ruled over an exceedingly beautiful garden that had won international acclaim. It was a far cry from her unremarkable birth into tenuous circumstances in Shanghai.

Most remarkably, Peggy not only suffered internment in a Japanese camp in China during the Second World War, but she kept a clandestine journal during her entire two and a half years there. This journal was later published (and recently reprinted; see p. 15), offering a unique window onto the internment experience and illuminating Peggy's equally unique strength of spirit.

Buy from StoreBiography, 210 pp, 6 x 9, over 125 photos
ISBN 1-55039-125-9, paper, $22.95


The Garden That You Are

Photography by Rod Currie and Quinton Gordon

If gardening is a cycle of growth, enrichment, decay, and rebirth, so is the nature of humanity: in our societies, our cultures, and our relationships. For the gardeners among us, it's more than an analogy. Our gardens and our lives are inextricably intertwined. Who we are; where we were born; our heritage; our family and friends; the events in our lives—all play a role in the daily experiences on the piece of land we call our garden. That piece of land we have chosen (or which, in some cases, has chosen us) will in turn influence who we are, our relationships, and the events in our lives. Such is the culture of gardeners.

Buy from Store192 pp • 8 x 9
ISBN 1-55039-160-7 • hardcover • $28.95
full colour


Made to Measure

A History of Land Surveying in British Columbia

The settlement history of British Columbia—this rough and beautiful child of imperial ambition—is different from that of any other province in Canada. The work of land surveyors has been fundamental in that history. The story of their work is awe-inspiring.

Made to Measure paints an engaging, vivid portrait of surveyors and their influence on British Columbia, linked inextricably to both past and future settlement of this remarkable province.

Buy from StoreHISTORY • 320 pp • 6.5 x 9.5
ISBN 1-55039-153-4 • hardcover • $34.95
maps • 100 b/w photos


The Slocan

Portrait of a Valley

The Slocan Valley, in the heart of the southern interior of British Columbia, is a slender blue-gold arc of water, pastures, and trees nestled between the Selkirk and Monashee Mountains. Although barely 120 years old in terms of European settlement, the valley has been the amphitheatre in which much of British Columbia's and Canada's most dramatic history has played out.

This larger history is peppered with intriguing miscellany: the Greyhound Bus Company had its humble origins in nearby Nelson; David Suzuki was interned at Lemon Creek as a child; Sandon (permanent population of five) has the oldest continuously running hydroelectric plant in North America, still servicing the valley.

The Slocan: Portrait of a Valley links the region and its people to the broader history of B.C. and Canada, and opens a window on the culture and lifestyles in the area today. It paints an engaging, vivid portrait of a living valley and tells the compelling stories of its people.

Buy from StoreHistory • 260 pp • 6½ x 9½
ISBN 1-55039-145-3 • paper • $24.95

 
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